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Scanning probe microscopy
Optical profilometry
Infrared microscopy
Collages and artworks




Scanning probe microscopy

Most of the topography measurements presented below were carried out in the ambient conditions with the scanning probe microscope (SPM) Solver™ P4 from NT-MDT Co. using silicon cantilevers manufactured by the Institute of Physical Problems (typical probe radius is less than 10 nm). The microscope was placed on a heavy base equipped with a passive seismic isolation and passive thermoisolating box, both homemade. The thermoisolating box also serves as an acoustic cabinet. No image smoothings were executed in the most work scans given below. To get enlarged picture, click on it


Copyright © 2003-2013 R. V. Lapshin. The topography images may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author


most recent first

Carbon nanotori synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition
Poly(methyl methacrylate) film nanostructured in oxygen plasma
Carbon film plasma-deposited on polyurethane
Carbon clusters plasma-deposited on low-density polyethylene substrate
Hollows in the aluminum substrate formed after removing porous alumina
Mechanical indentation of silicon probe in copper thin film
Mechanical indentation of silicon probe in aluminum foil
Nanostructured surface of electrochemically polished aluminum foil
Surface microstructuring at low vacuum condensation of aluminum vapours
Electrochemically etched ordered pores in alumina
Through ordered pores in alumina membrane
Disordered array of pores in alumina membrane
Quasiordered array of opal balls on silicon substrate
Ordered array of opal balls on silicon substrate
Gold-covered ordered array of opal balls
Ordered areas of nonspherical opal particles
Carbon clusters plasma-deposited on electron resist substrate
Silicon surface submicron structuring induced by oxygen adsorption

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Carbon nanotori synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

Carbon nanotori synthesized by PECVD method

The carbon nanostructures in the form of nanotori (nanodonuts, AFM Smena™ HV, ambient conditions, tapping mode, k≈12 N/m, f=279 kHz) were obtained by method of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on the experimental system “Diamond”. The largest nanotori have outer diameter equal to 960 nm, inner diameter – 230 nm, nanodonut height – 150 nm. By using highly reactive catalytic nanoparticles of nickel, the temperature of the synthesis process was decreased from 750°C to 150°C. Polished Si-wafer was used as a substrate. The experimental results were obtained with the active participation of researchers from the Institute of Physical Problems: postgraduate P. V. Azanov, Prof. E. A. Ilyichev, Dr. G. N. Petruhin, and postgraduate L. L. Kupchenko



Carbon nanotori synthesized by PECVD method

Zoomed in surface area



Carbon nanotori synthesized by PECVD method

Zoomed in surface area consisting of separate “Nanodonuts



Carbon nanotori synthesized by PECVD method

Close-up view of single “Nanodonut



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Poly(methyl methacrylate) film nanostructured in oxygen plasma

Nanostructured poly(methyl methacrylate) film

Spin-coated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film after treatment in nonequilibrium oxygen RF-plasma (AFM, tapping mode, k≈12 N/m, f=131 kHz). Оperating frequency of RF-oscillator made 13.56 MHz, residual pressure 10-20 Pa, glow discharge power 500 W. Polished Si-wafer was used as a substrate



Nanostructured poly(methyl methacrylate) film

Zoomed in surface area



Nanostructured poly(methyl methacrylate) film

Zoomed in surface area



Nanostructured poly(methyl methacrylate) film

Zoomed in surface area



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Carbon film plasma-deposited on polyurethane

Carbon film on polyurethane

Carbon film on polyurethane substrate deposited in pulsed arc plasma (AFM, tapping mode, k≈12 N/m, f=139 kHz). The carbon film presented is a prototype of biocompatible coating of human artificial blood vessels. The coating prevents growth of blood platelets on vessel walls. The sample is prepared by senior researcher A. G. Kirilenko (Institute of Physical Problems)



Carbon film on polyurethane

Zoomed in surface area



Carbon film on polyurethane

Zoomed in surface area. Gyrus-like surface morphology



Carbon film on polyurethane

Zoomed in surface area



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Carbon clusters plasma-deposited on low-density polyethylene substrate

Carbon clusters on polyethylene

An example of carbon clusters plasma-deposited on low-density polyethylene as a substrate (AFM, tapping mode, k≈20 N/m, f=132 kHz). This coating is considered to be perspective for engineering of human blood-vessel prostheses with reduced capacity for thrombocyte adsorption. The sample is fabricated by senior researcher A. G. Kirilenko (Institute of Physical Problems)



Carbon clusters on polyethylene

Zoomed in surface area



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Hollows in the aluminum substrate formed after removing porous alumina

Hollows in aluminum substrate

Hollows (pore bottoms) in the aluminum substrate obtained after removing porous alumina (AFM, tapping mode, k≈20 N/m, f=487 kHz). The sample is prepared by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Hollows in aluminum substrate

Zoomed in surface area



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Mechanical indentation of silicon probe in copper thin film

Thin copper film on Si substrate

Initial morphology of a thin copper film before mechanical modification (AFM, k≈90 N/m, f=403 kHz, film thickness 75 nm, Si-wafer substrate). The film is deposited by Dr. A. G. Klimovitskiy (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Array of Si-probe imprints on copper film

Plastic modification of the copper film: 10×10 array of cavities. The imprints were formed with Si-probe mechanically indented in plastic copper film. Two top rows are invisible because of drift. Shape of the imprints is also drift-distorted



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Mechanical indentation of silicon probe in aluminum foil

Initial morphology of textured aluminum foil

Initial ridged morphology of a textured aluminum foil before modification (AFM, k≈90 N/m, f=403 kHz)



Si-probe imprints on textured aluminum foil

Plastic modification of the aluminum surface: 5×5 array of cavities. The imprints were formed with Si-probe mechanically indented in plastic aluminum foil. The top row is seen incompletely because of drift distortion



Rectangle imprints on electrochemically polished aluminum foil

High-contrast rectangle imprints of Si-probe on electrochemically polished aluminum foil. The initial EC-polished aluminum surface was fabricated by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



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Nanostructured surface of electrochemically polished aluminum foil

Electrochemically polished aluminum foil

Nanostructured aluminum surface prepared by electrochemical polishing of a textured high-purity aluminum foil (AFM, tapping mode, k≈20 N/m, f=153 kHz). This is quasiordered surface, it is used as a substrate for subsequent manufacture of ordered quantum wire arrays applied in up-to-date optoelectronic devices. The sample is fabricated by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Electrochemically polished aluminum foil

Formation of aluminum pillars from parallel ridges. Pattern type and dimensions of the surface elements depend on conditions of the electrochemical etching



Electrochemically polished aluminum foil

Zoomed in topography area



Electrochemically polished aluminum foil

Phase image of the previous area



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Surface microstructuring at low vacuum condensation of aluminum vapours

Microstructured aluminum foil

Microstructured aluminum surface of plain “knobs” prepared during low vacuum condensation of aluminum vapours (AFM, tapping mode, k≈10 N/m, f=107 kHz). Field of application is high-value electrolytic capacitors. Effective square of the microstructured surface is 200 times greater than the initial plain area of the aluminum foil used as a substrate. This sample is fabricated by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Microstructured aluminum foil

Joint of two neighbor plain knobs



Microstructured aluminum foil

Zoomed in area of the joint



Microstructured aluminum foil

Phase image of the joint



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Electrochemically etched ordered pores in alumina

Ordered pores in alumina

Ordered system of pores in alumina fabricated by electrochemical etching of high-purity aluminum foil in oxalic acid solution (AFM, tapping mode, k≈100 N/m, f=417 kHz). This surface demonstrates a strong hydrophilic behavior. In order to resolve the pores, a low-temperature heating, dry glove box conditions or a low vacuum environment is required. The sample is prepared by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Ordered pores in alumina

Zoomed in surface area



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Through ordered pores in alumina membrane

Ordered pores in alumina membrane

Through ordered pores in a thin alumina membrane (AFM, tapping mode, k≈100 N/m, f=487 kHz). The sample is prepared by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Ordered pores in alumina membrane

Zoomed in surface area



Ordered pores in alumina membrane

Zoomed in surface area



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Disordered array of pores in alumina membrane

Disordered pores in alumina membrane

Disordered array of pores in a thin alumina membrane (AFM, tapping mode, k≈20 N/m, f=273 kHz). The sample is prepared by Prof. S. A. Gavrilov (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Disordered pores in alumina membrane

Phase image



Disordered pores in alumina membrane

Zoomed in surface area



Disordered pores in alumina membrane

Phase image



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Quasiordered array of opal balls on silicon substrate

Quasiordered array of opal balls

Quasiordered array of opal balls (synthetic opal) assembled on Si-wafer as a substrate (AFM, tapping mode, k≈90 N/m, f=417 kHz). Opal balls are SiO2 spherical particles deposited from suspension on a plain substrate. The deposited solids are used as photonic crystals. Point packing defects are well noticeable on the presented image. Some balls are weakly bounded and may be moved with the probe across the surface. The sample is prepared by Prof. G. A. Emelchenko (Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences)



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Ordered array of opal balls on silicon substrate

Ordered array of opal balls

Ordered array of opal balls on Si-wafer as a substrate (AFM, tapping mode, k≈90 N/m, f=418 kHz). The sample is prepared by Prof. G. A. Emelchenko (Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences)



Ordered array of opal balls

Ordered array of opal balls

Zoomed in topography area



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Gold-covered ordered array of opal balls

Gold-covered ordered array of opal balls

Gold-covered ordered array of opal balls (STM, Utun=300 mV, Itun=1.0 nA, thickness of gold film 40 nm, molybdenum sublayer thickness 10 nm). Thin metal films are deposited by using electroerosion plasma coupled with laser-stimulation (neutral metal particles are separated from ions by means of magnetic field). The process is developed by Dr. V. M. Roschin (Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology)



Gold-covered ordered array of opal balls

Gold-covered ordered array of opal balls

Single gold-covered opal ball

Close-up view of a single opal ball. Separate grains of the gold film are well noticeable in the image



Single gold-covered opal ball

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Ordered areas of nonspherical opal particles

Ordering based on nonspherical opal particles

Several ordered areas is easily discerned each of which is composed of nonspherical opal particles (AFM, tapping mode, k≈100 N/m, f=487 kHz). Mean particle size makes 270 nm. The sample is prepared by Prof. G. A. Emelchenko (Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences)



Ordering based on nonspherical opal particles

Zoomed in surface area



Ordering based on nonspherical opal particles

Inca's stonework



Nonspherical opaline particles

Close-up view of “Inca’s stonework



Single opaline particle

Single nonspherical opaline particle



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Carbon clusters plasma-deposited on electron resist substrate

Carbon clusters on electron resist

These scans demonstrate carbon clusters plasma-deposited at low temperature (20-60°C) on electron resist (methylmethacrylate) as a substrate (AFM, tapping mode, k≈20 N/m, f=153 kHz). The substrate was preirradiated with ultraviolet (λ=180…260 nm) for better flatness. The carbon film imaged is a prototype of biocompatible coating for artificial human crystalline lens. The coating shortens healing time after implantation. The sample is fabricated by senior researcher A. G. Kirilenko (Institute of Physical Problems)



Carbon clusters on electron resist

Carbon clusters on electron resist

Carbon clusters on electron resist

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Silicon surface submicron structuring induced by oxygen adsorption

Etched silicon morphology

Oxygen-induced submicron structuring of Si(100) surface (AFM, contact mode). The sample was prepared in laboratory of Dr. V. D. Borman (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute)



Etched silicon morphology

Zoomed in surface area



Superstructure

Superstructure formation on silicon crystal surface



Etched pyramidal pits on silicon

Pyramidal pits etched in silicon



Etched pyramidal pit on silicon

Close-up view of internal structure of the pyramidal pit



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Optical profilometry

The topography images presented below were obtained with the optical profiler (interference microscope) Wyko NT9300 from Bruker Corp. Two main measurement modes of the instrument – the Vertical Scanning Interferometry (VSI) and the Phase Shifting Interferometry (PSI) were used depending on the typical vertical scale of the surface under investigation. Only compressed-air vibration isolation means build in the instrument were employed for seismic isolation. No intense smoothings or any artificial improvements were executed on the most images given below. To get enlarged picture, click on it


Copyright © 2003-2013 R. V. Lapshin. The optical images may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author


most recent first

Carbon dendritic patterns on silicon substrate
Quad plane-parallel bimaterial infrared detector

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Carbon dendritic patterns on silicon substrate

Carbon dendritic patterns synthesized by PECVD method

The carbon dendritic patterns were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. Catalytic nanoparticles of nickel on polished Si-wafer as a substrate were used in the process. Optical profiler settings: magnification 101×, PSI measurement mode, scan size 63×47 µm. The sample was prepared with active participation of postgraduate P. V. Azanov (Institute of Physical Problems)



Carbon dendritic patterns synthesized by PECVD method

Carbon dendritic patterns synthesized by PECVD method

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Quad plane-parallel bimaterial infrared detector

Quad plane-parallel bimaterial IR-detector

The infrared detector represents a microelectromechanical system (MEMS). The detector is composed of four bimaterial elements. Each element consists of a submicron thickness membrane supported by two bimaterial legs. The legs have two layers of material with different coefficients of thermal expansion. When incident infrared radiation heats the membrane, the legs are also heated. The leg heating induces a stress due to difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion. The stress leads to a flexure of the legs that, in turn, moves the membrane normal to the substrate. Sensitivity of best bimaterial IR-detectors may reach hundreds of nanometers per Kelvin.

Optical profiler settings: magnification 20×, VSI measurement mode, scan size 308×231 µm. The IR-detector was developed and fabricated by the group of researches from the Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology: Assoc. Prof. E. A. Fetisov, Dr. R. Z. Khafizov, Prof. V. A. Fedirko, Dr. A. M. Belin, Dr. V. J. Zolotorev, and G. A. Rudakov



Quad plane-parallel bimaterial IR-detector

Zoomed in area. Optical profiler settings: magnification 28×, VSI measurement mode, scan size 228×171 µm



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Infrared microscopy

The infrared images presented below were obtained with the infrared microscope (IRM) G3 SC5000 from FLIR Systems, Inc. IRM technical parameters: magnification 2.75×, field of view 2×2 mm, spectrum range 3.7-4.8 µm, temperature resolution 25 mK, InSb focal point array (FPA) 640×512 elements, operating temperature 80.75 K. The infrared microscopy is very useful when locations of overheatings, shorts or current leakages in IC chips should be found. The mentioned IC faults usually results in an abrupt localized heat dissipation, which could be easily detected on an IR-image. To get enlarged picture, click on it


Copyright © 2003-2013 R. V. Lapshin. The infrared images may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author


most recent first

Current leakage in capacitor of a digital microelectronic circuit
Local overheating in chip of a digital microelectronic circuit

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Current leakage in capacitor of a digital microelectronic circuit

Chip of digital IC

The infrared image of a chip of a digital IC before power on



Chip of digital IC

The infrared image of the same chip after power on 1.5 V. The bright circled area is the place where a current leakage of the chip capacitor was detected. The cause of the fault is a low quality of dielectric layer. IR-microscope settings: integration time 2 ms



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Local overheating in chip of a digital microelectronic circuit

Chip of digital IC

The infrared image of a chip of a digital IC before power on



Chip of digital IC

The infrared image of the same chip after power on. The bright circled area is the place where a local overheating of the chip was detected. IR-microscope settings: integration time 2 ms



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Collages and artworks

most recent first

Corals
Small Bigfoot
Organ pipes
Nanodonuts
Nanogyri of polyurethane brain
Stonework of ancient Inca



Corals

Rostislav V. Lapshin

Collage: Corals

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Desktop wallpaper

Copyright © 2014 R. V. Lapshin. The collage and the wallpaper may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author

Similar SPM-data

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Small Bigfoot

Rostislav V. Lapshin

Collage: Small Bigfoot

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Download (in Russian)

Desktop wallpaper

Copyright © 2013 R. V. Lapshin. The collage and the wallpaper may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author

Similar OP-data

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Organ pipes

Rostislav V. Lapshin

Collage: Organ pipes

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Desktop wallpaper

Copyright © 2012 R. V. Lapshin. The collage and the wallpaper may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author

Original STM-scan

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Nanodonuts

Rostislav V. Lapshin

Collage: Nanodonuts Collage: Nanodonuts

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Desktop wallpaper

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Desktop wallpaper

Copyright © 2011 R. V. Lapshin. The collage and the wallpaper may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author

Original SPM-scan

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Nanogyri of polyurethane brain

Rostislav V. Lapshin

Collage: Nanogyri of polyurethane brain

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Desktop wallpaper

Copyright © 2010 R. V. Lapshin. The collage and the wallpaper may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author

Original SPM-scan

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Stonework of ancient Inca

Rostislav V. Lapshin

Collage: Stonework of ancient Inca Collage: Stonework of ancient Inca

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Desktop wallpaper

Download

Download (in Russian)

Desktop wallpaper

Copyright © 2009 R. V. Lapshin. The collage and the wallpaper may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author

Original SPM-scan

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